Pray for Play

We have been very excited recently, to have had some discussions with people to explore what it would look like to pray for all the playgrounds across the area. Play is an important part of a childs life, fun, joy, should all be part of growing up. Playgrounds offer so much of this, but we also know that so many other things happen in play grounds, so why not pray? Pray for joy, fun, childhood, pray for safety, peace, and excitement for all young people who go there.

We will be sharing much more about this over coming weeks, as we look to a day where we can gather people to pray for local playgrounds. If you are interested please do get in touch with us, rtryouthwork@gmail.com

Please do pray for us as discussions carry on, and we look to how this can happen.

Engaging in the Culture

When we think of engaging with people or an area, we can often go with the mindset that we know best or have something that others need to hear and listen to. This means we often go in a spirit of power. But at Christmas, it is worth remembering how the son of God chose to engage with us, our world and our culture, becoming a dependant with nothing at all, growing up, learning and engaging in the culture that he sought to bring to love, peace, encounter and relationship.

Even though we may well have something of God that we carry with us at all times whenever we engage with others, how we choose to show this is key. At this Christmas time, is there something we can learn from the way that God chose to engage with us, live life with us, and in gentleness and compassion, transform lives and society?

Embracing Vulnerability

All the way through the Christmas story we read about vulnerability. Mary and Joseph in their contexts; the shepherds leaving their work; the wise men talking to the king; and maybe most of all, Jesus himself – King Jesus becoming a human baby; reliant, dependant upon a human couple to look after him.

Vulnerability for people in the story, as well as people today, happens in a couple of different ways: People can make us feel vulnerable, as I expect Mary and Joseph felt, (and I also expect Herod felt when he was told the news about the new king being born); or we choose to make ourselves vulnerable, as the shepherds did, and as Jesus himself did.

Vulnerability is often regarded as a sign of weakness, but through the birth and life of Jesus we see that vulnerability is not a sign of weakness to God but rather a sign of strength in relationship. How amazing is it to think that Jesus made himself vulnerable enough for us to have a strengthened relationship with the father in Heaven.
This Christmas time, how about making ourselves vulnerable before Jesus as he made himself vulnerable for us?