Crazy Obedience

Obedience is one of those things which is often spoken about but it really does take a lot to put into action. As we think about Advent and the lead up to Christmas, obedience is key to the whole of the story.

Firstly, Jesus himself had to be obedient to come to earth! It would have been so easy surely for God to have come up with another plan, another idea, rather than sending his son to us here on earth, in the midst of hurt, pain, turmoil, trouble, anger and even risk, but yet it happened. Jesus, the son of God came to earth! Came to be amongst us, his choice, his obedience!

And then there was Mary and Joseph! We spoke about their ability to hear God's voice previously, but to then act on it in total obedience, even when the whole thing would have seemed strange, odd or peculiar to what they knew, their traditions and so on. Yet they did what God said, and were obedient.

Obedience will be tough when everything around us will be saying something different or suggesting that there must be another way! Yet the challenge for us is to think through where we put our trust. Do we trust the culture around us more than God? Do we trust the voice of our culture more than the voice of God? Do we only give part of ourselves because we are uncertain? If God was prepared to take a risk and Jesus was obedient for us, can we rise to that invitation for us to be obedient to what God is asking of us?

On the Move

This is the first of our Advent reflections, and we wanted to reflect on the fact that God is on the move!

But God has always been on the move, and this is so represented in the life of Jesus even when he was a baby. From the point of birth, his family took him on an adventure (even if it was for his own safety). They took him to different places, and he was on the move. Living in different places, engaging with different people in different ways, Jesus was not confined to one place, nor to one people group, and God today is not confined!

God is continually on the move, inviting people to engage with him, opening his arms to receive, going to where people are, not just expecting them to come to him. If Jesus moved around during his life, and God is on the move, shouldn't we be people who are going to where people are, reaching out to them, engaging with them in their contexts, in their lives and circumstances?

During this season, let's be open to where God is on the move, but also ask, where is it that we should be on the move also?

Having things in the right place and in the right order

As you may have picked up by now, Andy is busy writing a book exploring how leaders flourish. One of the books he has been reading for his research is called Leading Out of Who You Are, by Simon Walker.

Something Simon writes in the book is: 'What we need to grasp is that the front stage and the back stage are always connected.' For leaders, it is important to realise this connection because  for so much of our lives, people look at our "front stage" - what we do and who we are in public. It is more rare for people to ever ask about the back stage, the unseen, the not public side of our lives.

What we do upfront, engaging with young people, speaking with our teams, engaging with parents, speaking at conferences or even in our church gatherings, is underpinned by what is going on in our back stage, the unseen places.

This is not a permission-giving blog to say that we should be asking anyone and everyone about their back stage, or even feel that everyone can ask about ours, but what it does mean is that every leader should have a few people around them who can ask questions and with whom they can be really honest, knowing they are not going to be judged or condemned.

Ministry is a privileged place but also a vulnerable and often a lonely place. Our back stage may be where so much happens that people do not see or ever really appreciate but it foundational to our front stage, to who we are and how we display ourselves.

Back stages also take time to develop, to ensure the right things are in place; they just don't get created overnight. Not only do they take time to develop, but they also need maintaining. Time needs to be taken by, and given to, a leader so that everything they give in public comes from a good strong foundation of a back stage.

So, questions:

Are you looking after your back stage space?

Do you ever ask or support a leader in the maintaining of their back stage space?

Do you ever over expect from a leader about their front stage without caring about the back stage?

How much time do you as a leader give, or how much time do you as a supporter allow your leaders to take care of their back stages?

Releasing the Reapers

In a recent time of prayer, there was a focus on Matthew 9.36-38, where Jesus sees the crowds and has compassion on them all. He tells the disciples that the harvest is plentiful but the workers are few. I was drawn to the 3 letters, RTR, which obviously stand for RollTheRock, but I felt there was more, and over a little time, God gave me a new sense of these initials - that they stood for Releasing the reapers.

Jesus tells the disciples that the harvest is plentiful, a large harvest, if you like, to be reaped. We shouldn't underestimate all that it is that God wants to do and the lives he wants to draw close to himself. How often do we sell ourselves short, or God short, because we haven't grabbed hold of the vastness of all that it is that he wants to do.

But then Jesus says that the workers are few. If this is the case, do we need to shift our position to be more releasing? If the harvest is that vast, then it will take more workers to harvest it. It is more than possible that there are people ready to reap, but they are waiting to be released, sent, by others in leadership. The workers may be few partly because people haven't stepped up to the call of God on their lives, but it also might be because they haven't felt that release and sending by those in leadership over them. If the harvest is to be truly reaped, then more people need to be sent and more need to respond to the call of God to be sent.

Reaping is an outward activity; the crops don't come to a farmer, the farmer has to go to them to reap. So why do we think that people are going to come to church gatherings, when we know that they aren't? The reality is that we are going to need to go to where they are, so that reaping can properly take place. So we need to stop the hoarding and be a lot more releasing of people if we are to see the harvest being reaped.

The harvest may well be vast, but so is the need to send the reapers, which is why we need to be church that releases the reapers.