Why youth leaders are often to afraid to scatter the seed

This may be true for many Christians, not just youth leaders, but it does strike me that there is often a singular issue that restricts the sowing of the good seed that God has given us. And what is that restriction? The fact that we define what the result has to be!

So many times I have heard youth leaders say that they are reluctant to do anything missional, because they don’t know what the thing will look like in the end! they need to have the totality of the picture in place, so they either engage themselves or encourage their young people to engage. But what would it look like if we didn’t have the complete picture in mind? If we were not so dictative about how things must look once a seed is sown? As Jesus invited the disciples to follow him, as he engaged with others during his journeys, there was no complete picture given, no definable absolute to how things had to be that was shared. There was a journey that was invited into, and life discipleship worked out as the journey was embarked upon. Why is it that we restrict ourselves to defined pictures of how things have to be, rather than enjoying the journey that God invites us on, and seeing where he leads? The farmer scattered the seed, some fell on 4 different types of ground. but it did not restrict him from scattering the seed. He never said to himself, “I have no idea whether this flower will grow into the exact flower, shape, size, colour that i want, so i won’t scatter the seed.” If anything he probably knew the reality that some of the seed would not grow into anything at all, but he still knew that there wold be great stuff out of his sowing, and so he sowed. Could we adopt a similar approach?

Rather than defining what the outcome has to be, could we scatter some seed, and believe, that good things would come from that? Is our reluctance to scatter more about our own lack of belief and trust? Do we hold on to the seed that we have been given because we do not believe that it could grow into anything that God would want? Where do we place our trust?

Isaiah, 55.11 says that the word that goes out will not come back empty. But do we believe that? Do we believe that the word that we speak out from God will not come back empty?

so rather than placing our defined pictures, or personal restrictions upon being missional, sowing the seed, sharing what god has given us, do this in a spirit of trust, belief, and enthusiasm.

Fullness of life without Jesus?

In John 10.10, Jesus said, that a thief comes to steal, but he comes to bring life in all its fullness. So What does a full life look like? Can there be a full life without Jesus? Could it be that something is missing if we do not have, and include what Jesus wants to bring to us? In one of their songs from about 20 Years ago, U2 used the phrase, ” Looking for a fill, that God shaped hole “, from their Pop album. As we are all created in Gods image, do we look to the fullness that Jesus offers that he can give, or do we look to fill that god shaped hole in other ways? And what is it that we offer others around us?

There is so much in our culture today, so many things that people can fill their lives with, but how much do we give room for Jesus and what he wants to bring to our lives.

Valuing young people is vital, important, absolutely right, but where do they get that sense of value from? Us? themselves? people around them? Or do we point them, help them see God who values them even more, and wants to bring ” life in all its fullness”, for them?

resources that bring value, worth, identity are all great, but without all that God has for them, there is still something missing in the resources.

Do we ourselves, know what it means to receive the fullness of life that Jesus was offering to us? Because it is only when we start to get a grip of that, that we have something really worth offering to other people. yes we can find part of that in ourselves, in people around us, but the God shaped hoel, is only filled by what God brings to us, and we have to come to him to receive it. Lets not sell young people short, we need to offer them everything, and that has to include the fullness of life that Jesus offers, without offering that, there will always be that Godshaped hole.

Embracing Vulnerability

All the way through the Christmas story we read about vulnerability. Mary and Joseph in their contexts; the shepherds leaving their work; the wise men talking to the king; and maybe most of all, Jesus himself – King Jesus becoming a human baby; reliant, dependant upon a human couple to look after him.

Vulnerability for people in the story, as well as people today, happens in a couple of different ways: People can make us feel vulnerable, as I expect Mary and Joseph felt, (and I also expect Herod felt when he was told the news about the new king being born); or we choose to make ourselves vulnerable, as the shepherds did, and as Jesus himself did.

Vulnerability is often regarded as a sign of weakness, but through the birth and life of Jesus we see that vulnerability is not a sign of weakness to God but rather a sign of strength in relationship. How amazing is it to think that Jesus made himself vulnerable enough for us to have a strengthened relationship with the father in Heaven.
This Christmas time, how about making ourselves vulnerable before Jesus as he made himself vulnerable for us?

Discipline of Waiting

We do not read much after she is told about her pending pregnancy of how Mary must have felt about what was about to happen. There is some detail in the Bible, but not much. But what is clear is her patient waiting; waiting for what she knew was going to happen; waiting because she knew that what was about to happen was coming from God. She gave herself to God, gave herself to the waiting and gave herself despite of herself.

Waiting is often a difficult thing. It is difficult to practice, especially in a culture that is becoming more and more immediate in its response and activity.

There is something that is both challenging and yet prophetic about the discipline of waiting that maybe our culture could do with experiencing, noticing and even recognising that it is missing out on.

Amidst the activity, all the expectations of all that people think should happen at this time, where are we waiting? What are we showing to the culture around us if we do not engage in the discipline of the waiting?

We can wait expectantly – this is different to impatience – and we should be expectant about what God is doing and will do. But as Mary knew what it was that she was waiting for, what is it that you are expectant for this season? What are you waiting for God to deliver in your life?

Wait in expectancy, but wait in spending time with God, so you know what it is that he wants to give you.